Spotlight on Laura Adams

Laura Adams’ process is deeply rooted in observation. It starts at the initial point of inspiration, where she is struck by the way in which a ray of light dramatically cuts across a section of wallpaper, the undulating curves of a headboard, or the ornate patterns of a British textile designer.

She then demonstrates the ability and passion for seeing what others would overlook during the act of painting itself, in which each work is developed over numerous phases of layering details. The final product renders each subject extraordinary through her use of rich color palettes and the illusion of light on a variety of surfaces. Countless studio hours spent on each piece are manifested in paintings that are not simply appealing to behold, but evoke the connection the artist feels towards each object, an idea further emphasized by the choice to work on small scale canvases. Viewers are drawn to her works and invited to look closely just as one would hold a tangible object up to her face to admire it. In this way, the act of observation becomes a device not only for the artist, but also for her audience.

She documented the creation of her recent work “Compton” (2016-17, oil on panel, 10 3/4 x 10 3/4 inches). See the fascinating progression below!

HER FIRST STEP IS TO CHOOSE THE SUBJECT, IN THIS CASE A DRAGONFLY PIN PLACED ON A PATTERNED WILLIAM MORRIS SILK SCARF, AND ARRANGE THE STILL LIFE TO WORK FROM. SHE THEN CREATES A GRID TO FACILITATE THE DRAWING PROCESS AND UTILIZES A COMBINATION OF TRACING AND FREEHAND SKETCHING TO RENDER BOTH ITEMS, PAYING CLOSE ATTENTION TO HOW THE FOLDS IN THE FABRIC DISTORT THE FLORAL DESIGNS.

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